Comics // Review // Doctor Strange #2

Concise //

Writer Jason Aaron has a fun vision for the good doctor, something akin to a mystical special agent in a dangerously chaotic world, and it is incredibly well served by bottling the characters up in a familiarly unfamiliar place for an entire issue; the sanctum sanctorum. Chris Bachalo is an artist at home creating panels of mad, frenetic action and this issue gives him plenty of opportunities as things go from strange to worse during a magic-maggot hunt throughout the house. This issue is everything I want from a Doctor Strange book; high concept magical nonsense, funny scenes, and unknowable impending mystical doom – a great issue all round.

Doctor Strange #2 Cover

Spoilerful //

Despite the fun concept and some very neat scenes I had plenty of misgivings after issue one of this new Doctor Strange, fortunately this issue manages to avoid the things that disquieted me most (if only through ignoring them rather than correcting them), instead making way for an incredibly fun bottle issue. The creatures that escaped Zelma Stanton, librarian from the Bronx’s mind at the end of last issue have made their way into the corners and crevices of the Sanctum Sanctorum and Doctor Strange is temporarily inexplicably powerless to contain them. So instead Strange and Zelma have to traipse around the house trying to find and kill these ‘mind maggots’ by hand. It’s essentially a super simple plot, but it is fully capitalised on in both the writing and art as every room of the house holds innumerable unknowable terrors and souvenirs that Strange has captured or collected on his way throughout the magical cosmos.

The issue opens with a full page look at the exterior of the Sanctum Sanctorum accompanied by a storied history  across a number of caption boxes. As interesting as the history of the building was it at first seemed strange for there to be so much background up front, but once it became apparent that the issue would almost entirely take place within those four walls it made a lot more sense. Really this issue does a lot of great work to introduce the house as a character in and of itself, and establish Strange’s world; both the immediate (the house in which he lives) and the distant (the magical dimensions that he guards us from). This version of Stephen Strange that I can get behind; a man possessed of incredible esoteric knowledge and bravery, all used in the service of protecting a world that he is from but not of. Strange may have been a regular human once, but the life he leads and the way he leads it ensure that he is not quite a regular human anymore. This issue goes to great lengths to establish that fact: the litany of mystical illnesses that he has, his various dangerous and nightmarish possessions, his tastes in otherworldly cuisine, it all serves to make Strange seem…well, strange. It’s for this reason that the characterisation from last issue that painted Strange as some kind of magical James Bond who sleeps his way through mystical missions doesn’t sit well with me – besides making Strange into a poor Tony Stark stand-in it also makes him seem all too ‘normal’, a word that he should never be associated with.

Elsewhere this issue, it is worth pointing out how consistently funny it is; with none of the heavy handed magic bar banter getting in the way like last issue, the jokes here stem from the bizarre eldritch world that Strange lives in and the blasé normalcy that he has in the face of utterly incomprehensible things. The cat-calling snakes, the Escher stairway, that refrigerator, the fact that after a near death book to the face Zelma finds Strange casually doing some research as if he absent-mindedly forgot to check she was ok. Wong also raises a smile in his first scene with Zelma, when he dryly and efficiently deals with a bunch of mind maggots and the terrors of Stephen Strange’s fridge all the while preparing a light lunch for the doctor. It all makes for a fun trip through a very unusual world and if writer Jason Aaron can achieve this kind of tone going forward then it will ensure this book remains a pleasure to read.

The set up for the wider arc also continues here, but in a far subtler way than last issue’s old father time monologuing about debts yet to be paid and such. For most of this issue Strange’s powers were on the blink for some reason, and the magical safeguards within the house failed to stop the mind-maggots at every turn. Even the presence of those maggots, creatures “never been seen in our dimension in all of recorded magical history” as Wong explains, hints at the darkness from another world that is creeping into the Doctors realm, and the fact that Strange has no answers establishes a chilling sense of danger. similarly the pretty traditional almost warning scene that closes the issue was compelling, as the sorcerer supreme of another dimension arrives to try and tell Strange what is going on. That he doesn’t quite make it was to be expected (and along with his failed attempt to get a message out in last issue’s bonus story gives the impression that this guy is having a very bad day), but it is an effective way to presage the horror that is coming to get our hero.

I am a huge fan of Chris Bachalo’s art and this issue takes full advantage of his style. Bachalo excels in creating brilliantly busy panels that fill the background and foreground with all kinds of eye-catching details but never feel over-crowded, so having Strange and Zelma walking through weird rooms and magic corridors gives plenty of opportunity for inventiveness. The Sanctum Sanctorum is brought fully to life with an array of beautifully realised spaces, just looking at that chaotic living room or hell dimension behind a door gives a real sense of the dangers of the magical world. Wong’s confrontation with the refrigerator and mind maggots is another page that works well as we get a batch of quick panels that almost felt like the comic book equivalent of editing in an Edgar Wright movie.

This issue fulfils everything I was hoping this book could be: it explores the dangerous world of magic, establishes Strange as an almost otherworldly figure who can still have a little fun, and sets the stage for some upcoming epic darkness. The supporting cast of Wong, Zelma, and even the Sanctum Sanctorum are in place and Strange is ready to investigate this rising threat; if the book remains this fun and exciting then we could be in for a great run.

Doctor Strange #2 Panel

Doctor Strange #2 // Writer – Jason Aaron / Pencils & Colours – Chris Bachalo // Marvel

Notes //

– Strange full of mind maggots at the end there looked really super disturbing!

– I like the idea that the house has just rebuilt itself every time it has burned down.

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